Monday, May 13, 2019

"My Tiny Hideout" ~ Simple. Hospitality. Perfected.





My Tiny Hideout's build was really tough, took too long, and I ended up spending almost $5,000 over my $20,000 original budget.  

This 119 square feet of tiny house really kicked my butt; 
emotionally, financially, AND creatively.

And as the designer, I pushed myself beyond my comfort zone, 
both architecturally and aesthetically.

But the results have exceeded even my expectations!



Signage Lettering by Jacob Obermiller in Portland Oregon.
Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Just like My Tiny Empty Nest, the Hideout's welcome wall includes coat hooks and a removable panel which covers the door to the electrical box.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Upon entry, visitors are greeted with the reminder that a sense of adventure helps when considering this climb to the queen bedroom loft.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

The kitchen is well equipped with pots and pans, plates and cups, 
linens and paper products;
and has a lovely view of the forest.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

My Tiny Hideout is full of dramatic elements, but the ladder to the twin loft isn't one of them.
Under it is the coffee bar / dining table / work space.
(because you can't have enough multi-purpose areas in 119 square feet)


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Storage is always a challenge in tiny spaces.
This circa 1900's Model T Ford trunk serves as storage for the iron and ironing board 
as well as backpacks and overnight bags.

Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Not everyone who stays here will be on vacation, 
some of our guests need a space to work.
And we bet this is the nicest "cubicle" our guests will ever work in.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

My Tiny Hideout is full of light and shadows created by a dozen windows.
Yes, a literal DOZEN windows to trim and wash and cover.
So. Much. Work.
But so amazingly beautiful and we couldn't be more proud.


Signage Lettering by Jacob Obermiller in Portland Oregon.
Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

And speaking of light, we love the way it reflects on the galvanized headboard art.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Looking across from the queen loft, you see nothing but forest.
(and your roommate's loft if they're lucky enough to have come along)

Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

So far, one of the most complemented elements is our led light / ceiling fan.
It is remotely controlled, reversible, and the fan has 3 speeds;
low, medium, and blow-your-hair-around high.

Photo by Mark Sharley Photography
Reclaimed Artwork by Derek "Deek" Diedricksen

Because corners shouldn't be boring or under utilized,
at the end of the queen bed you'll find hangers for your clothes 
and these cute little forest monsters to watch over them.


Signage Lettering by Jacob Obermiller in Portland Oregon.
Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

It may be only a twin bed but the new mattresses are soooo comfy!
And the loft "railings" double as bedside tables.

And, if you dare, sit up and slide your legs under the table top, and dangle them below.
You'll have the  best seat in the house and the perfect spot to view the happenings below!

Photo by Mark Sharley Photography
Reclaimed Artwork by Derek "Deek" Diedricksen

Here's a little alcoholic astronaut to keep you company because...why not!?


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

The view from the twin loft is equally stunning, and dramatic.


Signage Lettering by Jacob Obermiller in Portland Oregon.
Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Inspired by Amelia's build, the Hideout's bathroom doors are also frosted glass.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

It's challenging to make a 24 square foot room appear to be light and bright.
The use of two light fixtures and clear cedar T&G was the answer.
It smells amazing and works well for all three guests.

Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

The shower was a big oopsie when I discovered the fiberglass shower I bought wouldn't fit.
Instead we used a custom fabricated galvanized panel for the surround.
Galvanized metal then became a repeating element and created the masculine feel I was hoping for.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

The Nature's Head toilet looks right at home
and the vintage backpack adds whimsy and functionality to this tiny space.

Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Ready for breakfast?
The kitchen cart pulls out for convenient access to your supplies.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

The dual burner propane stove is easy to light, and use.
Finding this uniquely sized one, however, was far from easy.


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

Inspired by the morning light, Tea peeks out from the shadows...


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

It took over 2 years to curate the collection of items displayed in My Tiny Hideout.
While shopping, every time I would see something I felt evoked the theme, I would buy it.

This collection includes vintage tools, oil cans, medicine and alcohol bottles, a dark room timer,
lantern, grenade, and galvanized salt and pepper shakers with loose lids.
(too loose to use in the kitchen so they became decor!)


Photo by Mark Sharley Photography

We think the large deck and the forested setting are really important features
used for not only setting the mood
but also for increasing the functionality of the space.

At night, the windows glow and the deck beckons guests outdoors to dine and drink and relax.

~~~~

"I'M DONE!"
After 15 months of building, no two words in the English language are more welcome than these.
Oh wait....maybe there are....I just thought of two more....
"BRING WINE!!!"

~~~

Now accepting reservations for Summer 2019.

~~~

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this STUNNING creation!

THANK YOU...

...to Mark Sharley for framing, siding, trim and the completion of many other projects that are too numerous to count.

...to Mark Sharley Photography for his photographic talent.
(Yep, same guy as the framer)

...to my boyfriend Mark for his patience while I whined, and blundered about, and pushed myself.
(Yep, same guy as the photographer)

...to Jacob Obermiller for his artistic lettering contribution to the headboard art.

...to Derek "Deek" Diedricksen for his funky sense of all things reclaimed and artsy.
(aka: The Reclaimed Art Boards)

...to my numerous and amazing friends and my children for being patient while I was MIA for weeks at a time, either buried in tasks or taking a nap.

And above all, a HUGE THANK YOU to my material sponsors
for their enthusiastic and ongoing support.

I seriously couldn't have done it without you!



























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